Risk Happens! is full of useful tables and checklists

One of the things that makes Risk Happens! such a valuable resource for project managers and project leaders at all levels are the 60 tables and check-lists that it contains.  You will want to bookmark these and refer to them frequently.

Here is a full list of the tables:

  1. Table 1.1: Why Crises Happen
  2. Table 2.1: Estimating Techniques
  3. Table 2.2: Common Estimating Errors and Omissions
  4. Table 3.1: Variables of scale and complexity for your risk management process
  5. Table 3.2: Drivers of scale and complexity for your risk management process
  6. Table 3.3:  Sample Roles and Responsibilities for Project Risk Management
  7. Table 3.4: Reasons for documenting aspects of your risk management process
  8. Table 3.5: Typical Contents of a Risk Management Plan
  9. Table 4.1: Core Project Documents
  10. Table 4.2: Typical considerations for a Project Risk Potential Review
  11. Table 4.3: Indicative Risk Kick-off Workshop Agenda
  12. Table 4.4: Risk Identification using Personal Experience
  13. Table 4.5: SPECTRES
  14. Table 4.6: Risk Categories
  15. Table 4.7:  Risk Register Part 1
  16. Table 4.8:  Formal Description of a Risk
  17. Table 5.1:  Typical Descriptors for Likelihood
  18. Table 5.2:  Typical Probability Ranges for Likelihood
  19. Table 5.3:  Suggested Probability Ranges for Likelihood
  20. Table 5.4:  Suggested General Scales for Impact
  21. Table 5.5:  Suggested Scales for Schedule Impact
  22. Table 5.6:  Suggested Scales for Financial Impact
  23. Table 5.7:  Suggested Scales for Quality Impact
  24. Table 5.8:  Suggested Scales for Scope Impact
  25. Table 5.9:  Suggested Scales for Reputational Impact
  26. Table 5.10:  Suggested Scales for Health, Safety or Security Impact
  27. Table 5.11:  Suggested Scales for Environmental Impact
  28. Table 5.12:  Frequently Used Numerical Scale for Likelihoods and Impacts
  29. Table 5.13:  Example of an Exponential Numerical Scale for Likelihoods and Impacts
  30. Table 5.14:  Failings of Risk Scoring Systems
  31. Table 5.15:  Traffic Light Status Definitions
  32. Table 5.16a:  RMS Method
  33. Table 5.16b:  RMS Method
  34. Table 5.16c:  RMS Method
  35. Table 5.16d:  RMS Method
  36. Table 5.17:  Risk Register Part 2
  37. Table 6.1:  Tactics to Remove Project Risk
  38. Table 6.2:  Tactics to Reduce the Likelihood of Project Risk
  39. Table 6.3:  Tactics to Reduce the Impact of Project Risk
  40. Table 6.4:  Contingency Planning Process
  41. Table 6.5:  Elements of a Contingency Plan for Project Risk
  42. Table 6.6:  Risk Response Plan
  43. Table 6.7:  Risk Register Part 3
  44. Table 7.1:  Risk Register Part 4
  45. Table 8.1:  Leading Indicators of Project Risk
  46. Table 8.2:  Crashing the Timeline
  47. Table 9.1:  Scenario Planning Process
  48. Table 9.2:  Business Continuity Management Process
  49. Table 10.1:  The Stages of Resistance to Change
  50. Table 10.2:  Examples of Project Stakeholders
  51. Table 10.3:  Factors Affecting Stakeholders’ Attitudes to Risk
  52. Table 10.4:  Project Communication Strategy
  53. Table 10.5:  Stakeholder Communication Plan
  54. Table 11.1:  Typical Factors leading to a High Risk Project
  55. Table 13.1:  Typical Benefits of a Strong Risk Management Culture
  56. Table 13.2:  Elements of a Strong Organisational Risk Culture
  57. Table 13.3:  Steps in Creating a Strong Organisational Risk Culture
  58. Table 13.4:  Risk Management Maturity Levels
  59. Table 13.5:  Lessons Learned Register
  60. Table 13.6:  Post Project Risk Review
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